MedStar Health Partners with Baltimore Organizations and Stoop Storytelling Tonight

microphone and empty stool with spotlight onBALTIMORE, MD — MedStar Health and nine Baltimore organizations are partnering with the Stoop Storytelling series to present Of Substance, a free virtual forum where seven candid people will share their stories of thrill, peril, regret and their complicated relationships with drugs and alcohol. The event includes a special musical performance by Jeremiah Lloyd Harmon, an American Idol Top 10 Finalist, and will stream live tonight at 7 p.m. on each partner Facebook page, or here.

The Stoop Storytelling series is a Baltimore-based live show and podcast that features people who share their true, personal journey. Partnering with MedStar Health are Jewish Community Services, Behavioral Health System Baltimore, Catholic Charities, Baltimore Jewish Council, Maryland Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, NAMI Metro Baltimore, Creative Alliance, Goucher College and Baltimore Magazine, to bring awareness to the impact Of Substance use, drive education, prevention and treatment.

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) has identified September as Recovery Month to increase awareness and understanding of mental health and substance use disorders. Of Substance offers inspiring firsthand accounts of recovery that demonstrate the effectiveness of treatment and may mitigate stigma and misconceptions that potentially discourage others from seeking help.

"Jewish Community Services is committed to raising awareness about the potential risks of using drugs and alcohol," said Joan Grayson Cohen, Esq., LCSW-C, executive director for Jewish Community Services. "Through our work in schools and in the community, we know that young adults can be particularly vulnerable to some of the unintended, potentially life-changing social, emotional and physical consequences. JCS is proud to partner in this important evening of sharing and thoughtful conversation.”

“MedStar Health knows the impact substance use in our communities, and the first step that leads to solutions is to eradicate stigma that will provide education and courage to receive treatment,” said Ryan Moran, director of Community Health for MedStar Health. “This event offers the chance to do that through the power of sharing lived experiences with substance use. Our organization is proud to partner with some of the most important organizations in the Baltimore region to bring this forum to the communities we serve.”

For information, visit – bit.do/stoop-ofsubstance.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Toe and Knee Bones Used in First Ever Double Flap Hand Surgery

BALTIMORE—Using a bone from a patient’s knee and a toe from his foot, Drs. James Higgins and Ryan Katz of Curtis National Hand Center, applied a novel and previously unreported approach to rebuild the entire thumb of a 45-year old Glen Burnie man at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, June 9. The complex microsurgery case used two simultaneous tissue flaps to reconstruct a thumb that was completely amputated in miter saw accident last year.

“I believe his procedure- the double flap surgery- is the solution for patients with particularly severe hand injuries.  Although it is a new level of technical complexity, it offers hope for patients with similar traumatic injuries to return to a normal life,” said Dr. Higgins, Chief of Curtis National Hand Center.

When a miter saw accident left a contractor’s hand thumbless, surgeons at Curtis National Hand Center made him a new one.

Samuel Dillsworth arrived at MedStar Union Memorial by medivac in November with an injury known as a complete thumb avulsion amputation, in which the thumb was pulled entirely off the hand at its base – where the hand meets the wrist.

Toes serve as a nearly perfect replacements for amputated fingers since they are similar in almost every way having bone, tendon, joints, nerves, arteries and veins. In the most severe injuries, the big toe can be used to replace a thumb because of its greater potential to match the appearance of a thumb with plastic surgery. By harvesting only the smallest portion of the toe needed to reconstruct the thumb, patients do not experience difficulty with balance or walking. 

“My hands are my life,” said Mr. Dillsworth, a custom fabrication contractor. “I build cabinets from scratch and I love what I do. I need to use both my hands.”

Mr. Dillsworth’s injury presented a particular challenge: he lost the entire thumb and a long length of the bones that support the thumb base.  The destruction caused by the accident would normally have made his case impossible to reconstruct, even with use of his toe.

“Because of the patient’s substantial metacarpal loss, we felt a [big] toe transfer reconstruction would result in the new thumb being too short for adequate function. We had to create a novel procedure to give him the ability to use his hand again,” said Dr. Katz. “We planned a procedure involving adding length to the toe transfer by using a bone segment taken from the lower end of the femur, along with the small vessels on the medial surface of the bone.”

To make sure the toe and knee bones survived after transfer to the hand, Dr. Higgins and Dr. Katz together performed two simultaneous complicated microvascular surgeries.  They harvested the tissue from both sites, (the foot and knee), each carefully removed with their attached small blood vessels that would enable them to live in their new locations. Removing those structures with their vessels is known as a flap.  The surgeons affixed the toe flap to the femur bone flap. They restored blood supply to the parts by sewing the millimeter wide blood vessels under a microscope, using sutures thinner than human hair.  Combining these two flaps together, the surgeons were able to create, de novo, a full length thumb.

“I haven’t smiled so much in a long time,” Mr. Dillsworth said. “When they pulled the bandages off my hand I was afraid it would look freaky because my thumb was my toe, but it looks great. The next day I was actually moving my thumb.”

“Mr. Dillsworth can expect to use his hand in the same way he did prior to the accident,” said Dr. Higgins. “Toe-to-hand transfer surgery is the state-of-the-art reconstruction for the loss of multiple fingers or the thumb. Perfecting this technique is so gratifying because it enables us to give patients back their ability to grasp. No single operation of the hand vaults a patient’s function so dramatically.”

About Curtis National Hand Center
Since 1975, people all over the world have placed their hands in ours – Curtis National Hand Center. From repairing traumatic injuries to treating repetitive motion injuries, arthritic conditions and congenital differences, our goal is to restore the patient's use of the hand, wrist, arm, elbow and shoulder to the greatest degree possible. Our long history of experience, outstanding medical staff, and state-of-the-art facilities combine to create a treatment center that is the first choice in caring for the hand or arm, no matter how common or complex.

Today, Curtis National Hand Center is recognized as the largest, most experienced hand center in the nation. In fact, the hand center was designated by Congress as the National Center for the Treatment of the Hand and Upper Extremity. Call 877-UMH-HAND for a physician referral.

About MedStar Health
At MedStar Health, we use the best of our minds and the best of our hearts to serve our patients, those who care for them, and our communities. Our 30,000 associates and 4,700 affiliated physicians are committed to living this promise through our core SPIRIT values—Service, Patient first, Integrity, Respect, Innovation, and Teamwork—across our more than 300 locations including 10 hospitals, ambulatory, and urgent care centers. As the medical education and clinical partner of Georgetown University, MedStar Health is training future physician leaders to care for the whole person and is advancing care through the MedStar Health Research Institute. From our telemedicine and urgent care services to the region’s largest home health agency, we’re committed to providing high-quality health care that’s also easy and convenient for our patients. At MedStar Health—It’s how we treat people. Learn more at MedStarHealth.org.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

MedStar Health Foot and Ankle Surgeon Helps Competitive Athlete Get Back to Pole Vaulting

Stephanie Coleman tore her Achilles’ tendon in the middle of a decathlon, but that didn’t stop her from finishing her last two events. And thanks to foot and ankle surgeon, Dr. Jake Wisbeck, it didn’t stop her from competing again. Learn more about her journey to back to pole vaulting. 

For an appointment, call 877-34-ORTHO or to learn more about Dr. Wisbeck, visit MedStarOrtho.org/Wisbeck

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

MedStar Health Names David Stein MD, Regional Chief of Surgery

BALTIMORE— MedStar Health has named colorectal surgeon, David Stein, MD, Regional Chief of Surgery for MedStar Health and Chairman of Surgery at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center.

In the dual leadership role, Dr. Stein will oversee quality, safety and market leadership initiatives for MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center, MedStar Harbor, MedStar Good Samaritan and MedStar Union Memorial Hospitals, and lead a sweeping optimization plan for the new 82,000-square foot surgical pavilion now under construction at MedStar Franklin Square. Read more.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

MedStar Health is First in Maryland to Replace Mitral Valve Via Tendyne Transcatheter

BALTIMORE—Drs. Brian Bethea, John Wang, Nauman Siddiqi and Antony Kaliyadan of the MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute (MHVI) at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, successfully implanted the state’s first Tendyne transcather mitral valve replacement (TMVR) system November 14, as part of a national clinical trial testing the safety and efficacy of the implant as an option to open-heart surgery. Dr. Bethea is the MedStar principal investigator on the trial.

The patient, an 86-year-old Pikesville woman, was enrolled in the trial because of mitral regurgitation, (MR) a debilitating, progressive and life-threatening condition in which the heart's mitral valve does not close completely, causing blood to flow backward and leak into the left atrium of the heart.

The backward flow causes severe fatigue, shortness of breath, lightheadedness and a rapid, fluttering heartbeat. Severe cases can cause fluid to build up in the lungs, strain the heart and lead to heart failure. Patients with MR are also at risk for blood clots and stroke.

Four million Americans are affected by mitral regurgitation with only about 20 percent treatable by open heart surgery.

“The patient in this case really had limited treatment options because of the severity of her valvular disease her age and other factors,” said Dr. Bethea, Vice Chief of Cardiac Surgery at MedStar Union Memorial. “This is truly a groundbreaking advancement that is potentially lifesaving for patients who would not be able to undergo the risks of open-heart surgery. It will dramatically improve their quality of life.”

The device is a tri-leaflet, bioprosthetic valve available in multiple sizes, that once inserted through a small puncture in the side of the chest, and into a tiny incision at the tip of the heart is positioned inside the patient’s own mitral valve. Using a unique tether mechanism, the valve position is stabilized when the apical pad is applied directly to the heart.

The Tendyne mitral valve system is the first and only mitral valve replacement device that can be repositioned and fully retrieved, ensuring precise placement during implantation, which could improve patient outcomes.

The clinical trial, called SUMMIT, is expected to enroll 1,010 patients at 80 sites across the U.S., Canada and the European Union.

Tendyne Mitral Valve System is under investigation by FDA and is not commercially available.

Please click here more information

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About MedStar Health

MedStar Health is a not-for-profit health system dedicated to caring for people in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., region, while advancing the practice of medicine through education, innovation and research. MedStar’s 30,000 associates, 6,000 affiliated physicians, 10 hospitals, ambulatory care and urgent care centers, and the MedStar Health Research Institute are recognized regionally and nationally for excellence in medical care. As the medical education and clinical partner of Georgetown University, MedStar trains more than 1,100 medical residents annually. MedStar Health’s patient-first philosophy combines care, compassion and clinical excellence with an emphasis on customer service. For more information, visit MedStarHealth.org.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Curtis National Hand Center Experts Perform Rare and Innovative Surgery on Triplet Girl

Baltimore, MD — On New Year’s Eve in 2016, Juan and Alma Mota swaddled their precious new deliveries in pink and counted 30 perfect toes and 29 perfect fingers. Of their beautiful triplet daughters, Julianna was born with a rare congenital anomaly known as radial longitudinal deficiency (RDL) or club hand, in which the radius bone of her forearm failed to develop normally. The result of this for Julianna was a shortened forearm, with her hand folded inward at the wrist and an under developed thumb.

The triplets’ birth came just ten days after surgeons at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital’s Curtis National Hand Center in Baltimore performed the first surgery of its kind in the U.S., for the treatment of RDL on a 7-year old boy. Dr. James Higgins, chief of the Curtis National Hand Center and Dr. Ryan Katz, attending hand surgeon, used a bone with growth plates taken from the child’s toe, to construct a full-length radius. In a single surgery, Drs. Katz and Higgins were able to lengthen the boy’s forearm, correct the posture of his hand, and promote the potential for future growth. This novel procedure garnered national and international attention.

The unique approach differs from traditional RDL surgical treatments, which focus primarily on improving the appearance of the hand, but do not address function or allow for growth. One classic method of treatment fuses the hand to the forearm in a straight position. This classic approach removes the ability to move the hand at the wrist and does not stand the test of time – often resulting in the hand curving inward again as the child grows. 

After finding national news coverage of the case online, the Mota family, determined to find the best treatment for Julianna, set out on 1600-mile journey from Ft. Morgan, Colorado to the Curtis National Hand Center in Baltimore.

Helping Julianna achieve optimum use and an aesthetic result was a three-part process that began in September. Doctors applied a distraction device to lengthen and straighten the curved forearm, and to create space in the joint for the anticipated transfer of her toe. With this device, the forearm was lengthened over a course of six weeks.

In October, the next and most complex procedure was performed to harvest Julianna’s second toe and transplant the bone into her forearm. Using high powered microscopes in the operating room, and sutures thinner than human hair, Drs. Katz and Higgins surgically reconnected the tiny vessels of the bone’s blood supply into the space created by the lengthening device, to construct a partial radius bone. Transplanting the bone with its own vascular system and growth plates ensures Julianna’s arm will grow, remain straight, and have motion.

This is a technically challenging surgery where two attending surgeons and their teams operate simultaneously:  One prepares the hand to receive the transfer, and one works at the foot to remove the toe, while carefully preserving the blood supply.

“Both aspects of the case are very challenging,” Dr. Katz said. “At the hand, the normal anatomy is not there, and you have to preserve the important structures and the blood flow to the hand, prepare the site for a boney inset, a tendon transfer and ultimately, revascularization of the toe. We have to get it alive again.

“At the toe, you have to raise everything you’re going to use. We prepared tendon, nerve, bone and skin. Ultimately, you have to protect the critically important artery and vein.”

Additionally, and most innovatively, Drs. Katz and Higgins “banked” a piece of bone which otherwise would be discarded, by vascularizing it into Julianne’s hand. “Here it will remain safe and alive in her own body, until her parents are ready to move forward with surgery to construct a functioning thumb,” said Dr. Katz. “By banking the bone, there is potential for future reconstructive thumb surgery. It would require a tendon transfer, but we’ve laid the foundation for a novel reconstruction option.’

In November, the Mota family returned to MedStar Union Memorial Hospital to remove the hardware scaffolding that kept her little arm immobilized an ensure proper healing. Now in a cast, Julianna’s hand is upright, her forearm is straight, and will grow as she grows. She recovered quickly from the foot surgery; is walking and running without difficulty – challenging her sisters to keep up.

For more information on the Curtis National Hand Center or the MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, please visit medstarunionmemorial.org.

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About The Curtis National Hand Center

Since 1975, people all over the world have placed their hands in ours – The Curtis National Hand Center. From repairing traumatic injuries to treating repetitive motion injuries, arthritic conditions and congenital differences, our goal is to restore the patient's use of the hand, wrist, arm, elbow and shoulder to the greatest degree possible. Our long history of experience, outstanding medical staff, and state-of-the-art facilities combine to create a treatment center that is the first choice in caring for the hand or arm, no matter how common or complex.

Today, The Curtis National Hand Center is recognized as the largest, most experienced hand center in the nation. In fact, the hand center was designated by Congress as the National Center for the Treatment of the Hand and Upper Extremity.

About MedStar Union Memorial Hospital

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital is a not-for-profit, 223-bed acute care teaching hospital with a strong emphasis on cardiac care, orthopaedics and sports medicine. With roots stemming back to 1854, MedStar Union Memorial has provided high quality care for 160 years. As one of the region's top specialty hospitals, MedStar Union Memorial is home to: The Curtis National Hand Center, the only hand center designated by Congress as The National Center for the Treatment of Hand and Upper Extremity; MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute, a premier cardiovascular program in the mid-Atlantic, aligned with Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute, the nation’s #1 heart program; and MedStar Union Memorial Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, the oldest hospital based Sports Medicine Program in Maryland (founded in 1979).  In addition, MedStar Union Memorial offers a comprehensive range of inpatient and outpatient services including oncology, diabetes and endocrinology, general surgery, thoracic surgery, vascular surgery and palliative care.

MedStar Union Memorial is accredited by The Joint Commission (TJC). It is the first hospital in Baltimore to receive spine certification by TJC, and the first in the state of Maryland to receive advanced certification for palliative care. MedStar Union Memorial is also TJC-certified in hip and knee replacement, CARF-accredited in inpatient rehabilitation and Curtis Work Rehabilitation Services, and has been designated as a Primary Stroke Center and the Hand Trauma Center for Maryland.

MedStar Union Memorial is a proud member of MedStar Health, a non-profit, regional health care system with 10 hospitals and more than 20 other health-related services in the Maryland and Washington, D.C., area.

For more information, visit MedStarUnionMemorial.org.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Carrie Wells
Public Relations Specialist, MedStar Health Baltimore
443-613-1569 
[email protected]

MedStar Health Gives Infiltrative Cardiomyopathy Patients New Hope for Life

BALTIMORE—MedStar Health Heart and Vascular Institute has launched a program at MedStar Union Memorial and MedStar Good Samaritan hospitals to diagnose, treat and research two life-threatening heart conditions that often go unrecognized, and is developing the program into a nationally-recognized center of excellence that has no peer in the region.

The two conditions – cardiac amyloidosis and cardiac sarcoidosis – are known as infiltrative cardiomyopathies, in which the heart collects deposits of abnormal substances. In cardiac amyloidosis, abnormal components of proteins called amyloid collect in the heart and cause it to become thick and stiff. In cardiac sarcoidosis, clusters of white blood cells called granulomas accumulate within the heart. Both can lead to heart failure, arrythmias, and even sudden death.

MedStar Health is launching the program as new advances in medical imaging, technology and treatments have made diagnosing and treating the conditions easier. Both conditions often go undiagnosed for too long, and MedStar Health heart experts intend to expand care to more patients and catch their diseases earlier.

“Cardiac amyloidosis and sarcoidosis have historically been diseases associated with a poor prognosis,” said Farooq Sheikh, MD, FACC, a heart failure expert who is leading MedStar Health’s infiltrative cardiomyopathy program. “With new medical advances, the chances for improved outcomes for patients with these diseases has never been brighter. Through the MedStar Health program, patients have access to top specialists, the latest technology and a full complement of treatments including clinical trials, LVAD therapy and cardiac transplantations.”

Dr. Sheikh will start seeing patients at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital in January 2020. The program will also draw on the expertise of other nationally-recognized heart leaders including George Ruiz, MD, chief of cardiology at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital and MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, and Sandeep Jani, MD, the associate director of advanced heart failure and population health at MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute in the Baltimore region.

Once thought to be rare, heart and vascular experts are increasingly recognizing cardiac amyloidosis as a cause of heart failure. The hard, misfolded proteins involved – amyloid – are also implicated in brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Its symptoms – shortness of breath, fatigue and palpitations – can mimic other conditions. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a drug called Tafamidis to treat cardiac amyloidosis due to transthyretin (TTR) deposition. Two additional drugs, called patisiran and inotersen, have been approved to treat hereditary amyloidosis complicated by polyneuropathy. These drug developments have given experts new tools against forms of the disease. Several clinical trials are upcoming.

Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease that can affect multiple organs, including the heart. Recently, experts have recognized that the way sarcoidosis affects the heart is an underrecognized cause of heart failure. The disease’s heart involvement is “silent” in almost all cases, leading to underdiagnosis. Newer treatment options include non-steroid immunosuppressive therapies and implantable cardiac defibrillators.

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About the MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute is a network of highly acclaimed and nationally recognized cardiac experts and care programs spanning all 10 MedStar Health hospitals in the mid-Atlantic region. In the Baltimore area, MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute experts are accessible at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center, MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, MedStar Harbor Hospital, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, and more than a dozen community locations.  MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital is allied with the Cleveland Clinic, the nation’s #1 heart program, giving patients accelerated access to the most advanced research, technologies and techniques in cardiology and cardiac surgery. This alliance also strengthens excellent clinical care and enables high-level collaboration on research.

About MedStar Health

MedStar Health is a not-for-profit health system dedicated to caring for people in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., region, while advancing the practice of medicine through education, innovation and research. MedStar’s 30,000 associates, 6,000 affiliated physicians, 10 hospitals, ambulatory care and urgent care centers, and the MedStar Health Research Institute are recognized regionally and nationally for excellence in medical care. As the medical education and clinical partner of Georgetown University, MedStar trains more than 1,100 medical residents annually. MedStar Health’s patient-first philosophy combines care, compassion and clinical excellence with an emphasis on customer service. For more information, visit MedStarHealth.org.

Media Contacts

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Carrie Wells
Public Relations Specialist, MedStar Health Baltimore
443-613-1569 
[email protected]

MedStar Health to Stream Interactive Cancer Webcast on Facebook and YouTube

BALTIMORE—Cancer experts from the MedStar Health Cancer Network will discuss cancer prevention, detection and treatment options during a free interactive forum that will stream live from the MedStar Bel Air Medical Campus to Facebook and YouTube, Tuesday, Nov. 5 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Understanding Cancer: The Facts You Need to Know, features WMAR ABC News anchor Jamie Costello as the event’s host and moderator. Read more.

Media Contacts

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Carrie Wells
Public Relations Specialist, MedStar Health Baltimore
443-613-1569 
[email protected]

MedStar Health Opens New Vein Center in Baltimore

MedStar Health has opened a new Vein Center in Baltimore that will be led by vascular surgeon Margaret Arnold, MD, FACS, who will bring a strong clinical background in the treatment of vascular and venous diseases and will focus her practice on treating varicose veins. Read more.

Media Contacts

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Carrie Wells
Public Relations Specialist, MedStar Health Baltimore
443-613-1569 
[email protected]

Partnership with Violence Reduction Program Expands to Two More Hospitals

 

BALTIMORE—MedStar Health’s partnership with the violence prevention program Safe Streets, that started at MedStar Harbor Hospital earlier this year, will expand to two other Baltimore hospitals with the help of a $25,000 grant from the PNC Foundation.

MedStar Harbor positioned one part-time and one full-time associate, known as hospital responders, in its emergency department to work with both victims and perpetrators of violence. The evidence-based program aims to prevent violence before it occurs by employing street smart community members who have a lived experience with violence.

With the PNC Foundation funding, the Safe Streets program will launch at MedStar Union Memorial and MedStar Good Samaritan hospitals later this month as part of the Woodbourne-McCabe site.

“Violence is a public health threat and at MedStar Health, we feel it is part of our mission to try and reduce it,” said Ryan Moran, director of community health for MedStar Health in Baltimore. “Our existing program at MedStar Harbor Hospital, launched earlier this year, is a key way for us to serve the community and we are glad to be able to help expand it at our other hospitals.”

The responder will deescalate and mediate disputes that could otherwise lead to violence and work to prevent retaliation. The responder will also serve as a positive role model and help connect victims and perpetrators with jobs, education and other resources to help them live better lives.

“PNC is committed to serving the people and communities where we live and work,” said Laura Gamble, PNC regional president for Greater Maryland. “The Violence Reduction Program is one of the ways we invest in communities to help families and individuals access the resources they need to become self-sufficient.”

 

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About MedStar Health

MedStar Health is a not-for-profit health system dedicated to caring for people in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., region, while advancing the practice of medicine through education, innovation and research. MedStar’s 30,000 associates, 6,000 affiliated physicians, 10 hospitals, ambulatory care and urgent care centers, and the MedStar Health Research Institute are recognized regionally and nationally for excellence in medical care. As the medical education and clinical partner of Georgetown University, MedStar trains more than 1,100 medical residents annually. MedStar Health’s patient-first philosophy combines care, compassion and clinical excellence with an emphasis on customer service. For more information, visit MedStarHealth.org.

Media Contact

Debra Schindler
Regional Director, Media & Public Relations, MedStar Health Baltimore
Office: 410-554-2496
Cell: 410-274-1260
[email protected]

Carrie Wells
Public Relations Specialist, MedStar Health Baltimore
443-613-1569 
[email protected]